banner ad

NWS-Pueblo-/-Drought Information Statement-/-April 26, 2019

Drought Map for April 26, 2019

 

Improvement Continues In Drought Conditions across South Central and Southeast Colorado…

 

SYNOPSIS: 

Abundant precipitation across the state of Colorado over the past several months, especially for areas over and near the higher terrain throughout February and March, has brought marked improvement in the drought that has plagued Colorado throughout much of the 2018 Water Year (October 2017-September 2018). At and above normal precipitation across portions of the South Central and Southeast Colorado through the month of April, thus far, has allowed for continued improvement in the Colorado Drought. 

With that said, the latest Drought Monitor, issued Thursday April 25th 2019, indicates continued improvements across portions of the Sangre De Cristo Mountains, with Moderate Drought (D1) conditions now confined to southwestern portions of the state. 

Abnormally Dry (D0) conditions are now depicted across all of Custer, Huerfano and Costilla Counties, as well as the western 2/3rds of Las Animas County. Abnormally Dry (D0) conditions continue to be indicated across extreme southeastern portions of Chaffee County, most of Fremont County, northern through southwestern portions of Teller County, extreme southwestern portions of El Paso County, most of Pueblo County and extreme southwestern portions of Otero County. Abnormally Dry (D0) conditions are also depicted across west central portions into southeast portions of Mineral County, Conejos County, the eastern half of Alamosa County and extreme eastern portions of Saguache County. 

Drought free conditions are indicated across the rest of south central and southeast Colorado, which includes Lake County, most of Chaffee and Saguache Counties, northern portions of Mineral County, Rio Grande County, western portions of Alamosa County, southeastern portions of Teller County, northeastern portions of Fremont County, most of El Paso County, northeastern Pueblo County, Crowley County, the rest of Otero County, eastern portions of Las Animas County, as well as all of Kiowa, Bent, Prowers and Baca Counties. 

DROUGHT IMPACTS – FIRE DANGER

Abundant Fall, Winter and early Spring precipitation has helped to ease fire danger across south central and southeast Colorado, with most of the southeast Plains entering green-up at this time. 

AGRICULTURAL 

At or above normal precipitation over the last 6 months across most of south central and southeast Colorado has helped to improve soil moisture, especially across southeastern and southwestern portions of the state, where the latest Vic Soil Moisture data is indicating surplus soil moisture at this time. 

HYDROLOGIC 

The April 1st Colorado Water Supply Outlook Report indicated statewide precipitation for the month of March came in at 183 percent of average overall. The large March precipitation totals once again received a boost from the well above average precipitation across southwestern portions of Colorado, with these basins coming in at over 200 percent of normal for the month as a whole. The abundant March precipitation also helped to boost the 2019 Water Year statewide precipitation total to 123 percent of average overall. 

In the Arkansas Basin, March precipitation was 156 percent of average, which brings water year to date precipitation to 120 percent of average overall. 

In the Rio Grande Basin, March precipitation was 200 percent of average, which brings water year to date precipitation to 126 percent of average overall. 

Colorado NRCS data indicated statewide snowpack at the end of March at 136 percent of average overall, which is 194 percent of the available snowpack at this same time last year. Statewide snowpack received a big boost through the first half of the month, as snow accumulations between March 1st and March 15th were at near record levels across most of the state. 

In the Arkansas Basin, the April 1st snowpack came in at 149 percent of average overall, which is 269 percent of the available snowpack at this same time last year. Again, in stark contrast to last year, the

northern and southern portions of the Arkansas Basin are both above normal levels. The Upper Arkansas Sub-Basin came in at 151 percent of average overall at the end of March, as compared to the 75 percent of average snowpack at this time last year. The Cucharas and Huerfano Sub-Basin came in at 152 percent of average overall at the end of March, as compared to the 22 percent of average snowpack at this time last year. The Purgatoire Sub-Basin came in at 173 percent overall at the end of March, as compared to the 19 percent of average snowpack at this same time last year. 

In the Rio Grande Basin, the April 1st snowpack came in at 145 percent of average overall, which is and incredible 299 percent of the available snowpack at this same time last year. 

NRCS data also indicated statewide water storage was at 84 percent of average overall at the end of March, as compared to 115 percent of average storage available statewide at this same time last year. 

In the Arkansas Basin, water storage at the end of March came in at 90 percent of average overall, as compared to 131 percent of average storage available at this same time last year. 

In the Rio Grande Basin, water storage at the end of March came in at 79 percent of average overall, as compared to 119 percent of average storage available at this same time last year. 

CLIMATE SUMMARY – PRECIPITATION/TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK

The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) outlook for the next week indicates better chances of above normal temperatures and above normal precipitation across south central and southeast Colorado. The outlook for May, June and July gives equal chances for above, below and near normal temperatures across south central Colorado, with a slight nod to below normal temperatures for southeast Colorado. As for precipitation, the outlook gives better chances for above normal precipitation across all of south central and southeast Colorado.

Current Water Storage Capacity at John Martin Dam as of April 26, 2019, 171,500 Acre-Feet.

 

Filed Under: AgricultureCity of GranadaCity of HollyCity of LamarCity of WileyConsumer IssuesCountyEnvironmentFeaturedMedia ReleasePublic SafetyRecreationTourismWaterWeather

Tags:

About the Author:

RSSComments (0)

Trackback URL

Comments are closed.