banner ad

DROUGHT INFORMATION STATEMENT…National Weather Service

Representative Drought Map

A Wet and Cool May Help to End Drought across Southeastern Colorado…

SYNOPSIS:

An unsettled weather pattern across the area at the end of April continued throughout most of the month of May across south central and southeast Colorado. This unsettled weather pattern allowed for

multiple slow moving storm systems to move across the state, which brought abundant and much needed rain and snow to southern Colorado, especially the southeast mountains and plains.

With that said, the latest US Drought Monitor, issued Thursday June 15th, 2017, has eliminated drought conditions across all of south central and southeast Colorado, save for Abnormally Dry (D0) conditions being depicted across most of Teller County.

FIRE DANGER:

The abundant and beneficial moisture received over the past few months has helped to quash fire danger across the area, with fuels across the area assessed as being none critical. However, with dry, hot and breezy weather across the area over the past week, fuels are starting to dry, leading to increasing fire danger once again.

AGRICULTURAL:

The abundant moisture across the region over the past few months has helped to recharge soil moisture across southeast Colorado. However, dry, hot and breezy weather over the past week has helped to dry out top soils, with continued drying of rangeland crops likely over the next few weeks, before monsoon season begins across the region.

HYDROLOGIC:

June 1st statewide snowpack came in at 200 percent of median and is around the same percent of snowpack as last year at this same time. This is due to a late season storm that brought abundant snowfall to northern Front Range.

In the Arkansas Basin, June 1st snowpack came in at 139 percent of median, though is only 58 percent of the snowpack at this same time last year.

In the Rio Grande Basin, June 1st snowpack came in at 156 percent of median, and is 141 percent of last year’s snowpack at this same time.

Water storage across the state at the end of May was at 109 percent of average overall, as compared to 107 percent of average storage available at this same time last year.

In the Arkansas Basin, end of May storage was at 119 percent of average overall, as compared to 116 percent of average storage available at this same time last year. In the Rio Grande Basin, end of May storage was at 90 percent of average overall, as compared to 79 percent of average storage available at this same time last year.

Here are the current precipitation totals in inches for communities in southeast Colorado between May and July, 2017:

Springfield 8.9 NW

11.60
Las Animas 0.3 NE

11.34

Eads 0.3 W

16.77
Sheridan Lake 4.2 E

13.86

Burlington 7.7 NW

12.74
Trinidad 1.9 ENE

7.92

La Junta 1.0 S

11.28
Holly 0.1 ENE

11.40

Lamar 10.1 N

12.19

 

Print Friendly

Filed Under: AgricultureCity of GranadaCity of HollyCity of LamarCity of WileyCountyEnvironmentFeaturedRecreationWeather

Tags:

About the Author: